Surrey Wildlife Trust invites you to discover a diversity of species, encounter inspiring landscapes and become stimulated to protect nature. Shortlisted works from our Wild Surrey Competition will take you on a captivating journey of special moments in nature, exploring themes such as animal behaviour, insects in action and wild beauty.

Tejido is an exhibition of work created in response to two residencies in Mexico: Aramauca (San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas) and Laboratorio Oaxaca (Oaxaca city). The exhibition weaves the two region’s cultural identities and the materials and symbolism of their crafts with new processes - painting, silkscreen printing, film and video.

This new exhibition will bring together significant works that explores the history of Scottish Art. A Window into Scottish Art will shine a spotlight on the character, inspiration, and talent of Scottish artists and provoke new ways of defining their achievements.

The works will include paintings, drawings, sculpture and collage by artists such as George Jamesone (1587-1644) known as ‘the Scottish Van Dyck’, through to the Glasgow Boys and Girls and the Scottish Colourists (Peploe, Fergusson, Hunter, and Cadell). Twentieth-century figures such as Eduardo Paolozzi and John Bellany will join contemporary artists such as Caroline Walker, Barry McGlashan, and Iman Tajik who will further explore the contrasting sides of the Scots psyche.

The exhibition is drawn from two collections that complement one another: The Ingram and Fleming Collections. The Ingram Collection is now recognised as one of this country’s most significant, and publicly accessible, collections of Modern British Art, and the Fleming Collection is considered the finest collection of Scottish art outside public institutions.

The exhibition title “A Wider View” has inspired the individual artists who make up the group Fabrications.  They have each created personal interpretations using their background in Art & Design to produce new innovative, original work with paint, paper, fabric, stitch or mosaics.

This new exhibition will bring together significant works that explores the history of Scottish Art. A Window into Scottish Art will shine a spotlight on the character, inspiration, and talent of Scottish artists and provoke new ways of defining their achievements.

The works will include paintings, drawings, sculpture and collage by artists such as George Jamesone (1587-1644) known as ‘the Scottish Van Dyck’, through to the Glasgow Boys and Girls and the Scottish Colourists (Peploe, Fergusson, Hunter, and Cadell). Twentieth-century figures such as Eduardo Paolozzi and John Bellany will join contemporary artists such as Caroline Walker, Barry McGlashan, and Iman Tajik who will further explore the contrasting sides of the Scots psyche.

The exhibition is drawn from two collections that complement one another: The Ingram and Fleming Collections. The Ingram Collection is now recognised as one of this country’s most significant, and publicly accessible, collections of Modern British Art, and the Fleming Collection is considered the finest collection of Scottish art outside public institutions.

This exhibition focuses on a remarkable series of landscape-inspired paintings produced by the Scots/Irish artist William Crozier (1930-2011) from 1959 to 1962. This was a pivotal moment in the artist's work that captured the spirit of the emergent 1960s and established his reputation at the forefront of British art of the time. In Crozier’s response to the natural environment, he developed an innovative vocabulary of abstract gestures and marks, informed by European and American abstract painting.  Like an archaeologist, Crozier uncovered ‘the savagery just beneath the surface’ of the natural world, rather than representing its topographical appearance. In Crozier's paintings, the nature observed provides the catalyst for a radical vision that gives us landscapes of dark revelation. 

The Lightbox welcomes back the University for the Creative Arts (UCA), Farnham for an exhibition showcasing the very best artwork from MFA photography students. The UCA photography department has a reputation for educating some of the most innovative photographers of our time. This exhibition will offer visitors a unique opportunity to explore the vibrant and exciting works produced by emerging talent from the department.

8 January 2022 – 6 February 2022
Free Entry • £3 Suggested Donation

The first of its kind in over fifty years, this exhibition presents previously unrecorded works from Hubert Arthur Finney’s studio alongside the first-ever publication on the artist (1905-1991), based on his recently discovered autobiography.

Amongst Finney's most original and modern compositions are his interior and exterior views illuminated by artificial light – city streets and domestic interiors – which form a counterpoint to his more traditional gentle Berkshire and Surrey landscapes, painted preferably at dawn and dusk.

Initially studying painting under Amy Browning and Percy Jowett, and etching under Eric Gill, Finney went onto the Royal College of Art where he became a protégé of William Rothenstein. After this, he became a teacher himself working at Chelsea School of Art alongside Henry Moore and Graham Sutherland.£7.50 Day Pass • Lightbox Members and Under 21s Free

Kristina Chan, the 2020 recipient of The Ingram Prize, explores narrative and place, evoking a felt history through printmaking, alternative photography, and sculpture. Each work tells a story, exploring our relationship with place, constructed through personal and collective experience.

Adrift is an exhibition and expansion on the themes explored by her winning/selected work Banksia Seeds and builds on inspiration found within the Ingram Collection; specifically, in the works of Charles Gunner and William Turnbull.

“For me, it has always been a question of re-routing, in this moment between before and after. It is still and waiting, anticipatory and held. It becomes its own type of landscape, of precipice.”

This collection began in the Blue Mountains, documenting the approach of the 2019 bushfires that ravaged New South Wales, Australia, where she witnessed nature’s capacity for renewal, regrowth, and resilience in the wake of natural disaster and human impact. In the following months, upon returning to the UK, it later evolved, taking on a wider meaning, representing the strength and perseverance not only within the landscape but ourselves.

To this effect, there are two stories being told – one is physical, tangible, and geographic. Another is metaphorical – how we approach the very idea of where we are and the stands we take when we near our edge.

4 December 2021 – 2 January 2022
Free Entry • £3 Suggested Donation

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